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EDUC 751 – Assignment 3

  1. Restate your research questions.
  2. For each one, make a list of other variables or factors that are not listed in the question, but may also affect the outcomes.
  3. Add helpful comments with insights and/or questions for you classmates.   (do at least 3 good ones.

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54 responses to “EDUC 751 – Assignment 3

  1. Brittany L Clawson May 25, 2018 at 2:41 pm

    1) Do students of STEM schools (IV) achieve higher test scores (DV) on high stakes tests such as the ACT?
    Factors:
    Admission criteria of STEM school
    Socioeconomic status
    Teacher quality
    Amount of school funding

    2) What percentage of teachers experience an increase in classroom engagement (DV) when using STEM teaching methods(IV)?
    Factors:
    How engagement is measured
    Quality of STEM instruction
    Amount of STEM training
    Funding for STEM education

    3) What is the perception of STEM education among teachers in a traditional school setting?
    Current subject taught
    Years of experience
    Flexibility
    Amount of STEM training
    Quality of training

    4) In addition to what is already being implemented in a school, what additional steps would be necessary to transition to a STEM school?

    Factors:
    Availability of resources
    Amount of STEM already being implemented
    Funding
    Experience of teachers
    Flexibility of teachers
    STEM training

    • Wes Anderson May 25, 2018 at 4:55 pm

      Brittany,
      In regards to question 2, would you be surveying teachers from STEM and traditional curriculum schools?

    • Melissa Jolley May 25, 2018 at 7:54 pm

      Are you using teacher evaluations for “teacher quality”?
      Also, how do you plan to qualify the training or the STEM instruction?
      It looks like your target subject is High School, since you are using ACT-and when you get to that point I think it is important to state specifically. Jut because I am about to launch a STEM at my middle school and that is where my head is.
      I am especially curious about the socioeconomic status aspect, as I was curious about this and wondered if there is a social divide for STEM opportunities and exposure.

    • Jessica Ordonez May 25, 2018 at 8:16 pm

      Brittany,
      One factor you may want to look at is how long a school has been a STEM school and/or how long the students have been attending a STEM school.

      How will you define STEM school? AdvancEd accredidation, self-designated, or something else?

    • Clint Epley May 27, 2018 at 10:39 am

      Brittany,
      Your first quantitative question is interesting to me. So many schools desire to be labeled a STEM school but those that actually carry that label must be studied and learned from. STEM Chattanooga is amazing and I have wondered how other public schools could venture into those waters which makes your 2nd qualitative questions fascinating.

      What is unique about STEM schools? With so many public schools going 1:1, developing STEM labs, and holding STEM weeks… whats different about actual STEM schools? I know there’s a difference but to actually state it and provide evidence as to the benefits of said schools will be interesting. More studies like this need to be done!

      Clint

  2. Laura Mason May 25, 2018 at 2:42 pm

    Topic: Written expression and the use of technology
    Quantitative:
    What is the relationship between the use of technology (IV) and students’ writing skills (DV)?
    Factors: variety of different technology devices
    Grade level of students
    Gender
    What effect does the use of technology (IV) have on writing interventions (DV)?
    Factors: variety of different intervention methods
    Fidelity of implementation
    Specific skills being learned
    Qualitative:
    What perceptions do writing teachers have of students’ writing and their use of technology? (C/F teacher perception and use of technology)
    Factors: amount of class time spent on writing weekly
    Teacher’s familiarity with technology
    Teacher’s methods of teaching written expression
    What perceptions do students have on writing interventions and technology use? (C/F student perceptions and writing interventions)
    Factors: amount of time spent in writing interventions weekly
    Student’s familiarity with technology
    Student’s current level of writing skills

    • Cindy Widner May 25, 2018 at 5:01 pm

      Hi, Laura, as I read over your list, I thought about spelling skills not being part of the curriculum as an individual class/subject. I know from working with my gifted students, they complain about not knowing how to spell well because it isn’t taught anymore.

    • Teresa Kirkland May 26, 2018 at 4:17 pm

      Laura, I think teacher and student perceptions of writing and technology is an important topic. We live in a digital age, but so many educators do not take advantage of the available technology.

    • Clint Epley May 27, 2018 at 10:50 am

      Laura,

      This is an interesting study because I’m investigating the best 1:1 implementation processes. I have seen this first hand as my school system has been 1:1 the past four years. There’s been some good and bad so creating a blue print for future systems is interesting to me.

      Your first quantitative question is really interesting to me because I fear, for some, the use of technology jeopardizes students’ writing abilities. I have seen students type but are afraid when they have to write the answer(s) on paper. This fear could come from long existing problems the child has experienced while writing or it could’ve been developed as a result of large of amounts of digital content being assigned.

      Fine line no doubt. Interesting study that I’ll be following!

      Clint

  3. Mindy Volk May 25, 2018 at 3:00 pm

    Qualities of highly effective teachers. a.) After extensive PLCs on the TEAM rubric training (IV), what percentage of teachers (DV) scored a 4 or higher on level of effectiveness?
    There are many other factors (DVs) that could affect student achievement, including:
    1. Experience of teachers
    2. Subject-area taught
    3. Academic level of students
    4. Type of training received by each teacher

    b.) Do students’ test scores improve (DV) when a teacher’s classroom management is consistent (IV)?
    There are many other factors (DVs) that could affect student achievement, including:
    1. Academic level of students
    2. Amount of growth a student can make on tests (higher-achieving students do not have as much room to grow).
    3. Previous discipline records of students

    c.) What are the perceptions (F/C) of highly effective teachers according to administrators, teachers, and students?
    There are many aspects of the current practices that need to be considered in answering the question, including:
    1. Types of stakeholders being surveyed (elementary, middle, high)
    2. Socio-economical level of students
    3. Gender
    4. Subject-area taught by teachers

    d.) Do teachers’ strategies in the classroom (F/C) improve after watching three other teachers’ best practices?
    There are many aspects of the current practices that need to be considered in answering the question, including:
    1. Subject-area taught by observed teachers
    2. Activities/methods being used (hands-on, teacher as facilitator)
    3. Class time utilization (block schedule, modified block schedule)
    4. Teacher’s motivation for self-improvement

    • Cindy Widner May 25, 2018 at 5:07 pm

      Hi, Mindy, I just finished an assignment on teachers being observed within classrooms. The incoming teachers’ perceptions sometimes hindered their openness to constructive criticism. They were actually resentful about going into other teachers’ classrooms. This might be something to add to “d”.

    • Melissa Jolley May 25, 2018 at 8:05 pm

      I think you are exploring some really interesting areas. As someone who extensively taught others teachers about PLC’s, coached other teachers, and have always been a level 5 for student achievement, I received straight 3’s all the way down my evaluations this year and felt that I even though I could provide evidence of the contrary, there was little I could do. I did a lot of crying and felt very defeated.
      I would really like to have a non subjective approach to teacher effectiveness. I know that we are not jut test scores and the students are more than a number, but its very demoralizing to work so hard and have to eat a crap-burger.

  4. Katrich Williams May 25, 2018 at 3:49 pm

    PART A: For each of your two quantitative questions:
    • Restate the question, identifying the IVs and the DV
    o Will female teenagers who are pregnant [IV] become high school dropouts [DV] versus female teenagers who are not pregnant?
    o How many supplies and resources are available for teenaged girls who are pregnant [IV] to help prevent them from becoming high school dropouts [DV]?
    • Other variables that could affect the [DV].
    o Economic levels
    o Attendance
    o Gender
    o Ethnicity
    PART B: For each of your two qualitative questions:
    • Restate the questions
    o As they struggle to balance being a parent, what kind of assistance do teenaged mothers receive from their families, friends, teachers, and current or former boyfriends?
    o What role could the community play in helping young teenaged girls practice abstinence?
    • Brainstorm a list different aspects of the questions for which data could/should be collected and analyzed
    o Are teachers offering after school tutoring for these young mothers?
    o Have the families of these young mothers applied for homebound services?
    o Is there counseling available for the child’s fathers?
    o Are there non-profit educational programs available for teenaged mothers to teach them how to be mothers?

    My Comments on Cassie Worley’s Post:

    Cassie,
    This is a very interesting topic. I can agree that student motivation is an important factor when they are taking a standardized test. If they are not motivated and have no desire to do well on the test, chances are they probably won’t. Also, teacher accountability is key when talking about what impacts the learning environment. Although I don’t agree with teachers being held accountable for students’ success on standardized testing, we are often the ones who are responsible for a student passing or failing. This can have a major impact on the learning environment.

    My Comments on David Lee’s Post:

    David,
    I certainly feel that parental involvement is important when it comes to students’ perceptions on single-sex education in the real world. Parents play a vital role in their child’s development. Based on the parent’s perception of single-sex education in the real world, their child may possibly have the same view.

  5. Travis Jolley May 25, 2018 at 4:13 pm

    Quantitative questions – a. What levels of per pupil spending [IV] do schools maintain in relation to standardized test achievement [DV]? In addition to per pupil expenditures, standardized test achievement can be affected by a host of factors including: teacher effectiveness ratings, curriculum quality, student and teacher absenteeism, test-taker anxiety, the depth of the academic standards, and the alignment of classroom lessons to tested material.

    b. What is the breakdown of teacher effectiveness ratings [IV] at schools related to student performance [DV]? On top of teacher effectiveness ratings, student performance at school is impacted by: student attitudes towards learning, teacher and student absenteeism, availability/quality of special education services, resource management, community/family influences, and language deficits.

    Qualitative questions – a. How do current teachers feel their current professional needs and their students’ needs are being met under the current leadership systems? There are many facets to fully answering this question. I will seek to gain data on the following areas including: 1. What do educators think their most pressing needs are? 2. What do educators think their students’ most pressing needs are? 3. How do teachers view their principal’s efforts to secure and maintain their personal needs in accordance to student needs? 4. How do teachers rate their local, state, and national governments’ efforts to provide for the needs of teachers and students? 5. What steps have teachers undertaken to better achieve their needs and those of their students?

    b. How do educators assess what the solutions are for ensuring a high-quality education for all students? While investigating this question, I would seek to gain information about: 1. How do teachers formulate what they consider to be workable solutions? 2. What do educators view as a high-quality education? 3. What outcomes do educators desire to see in order to assess educational improvement? 4. Which student groups do educators feel are the most vulnerable to not receiving a high-quality education? 5. What steps have educators taken to solve the problem of unequal educational outcomes in their classrooms?

    • Cindy Widner May 25, 2018 at 5:11 pm

      Travis, as I read your post, it came to mind about how leaders can solve the problem of excessive absenteeism of teachers? (Qualitative–b)

    • Janie Evans May 27, 2018 at 10:10 pm

      Travis: You pose some very interesting questions regarding pupil spending. It will be interesting to know if the 1:1 ratio and spending on technology has any bearing on test scores.

  6. Cindy Widner May 25, 2018 at 4:37 pm

    Topic: Implications or effects of RTI2B
    Quantitative:
    1. Did the implementation of RTI2B (IV) have an effect on the number of office referrals (DV)?

    * There are many factors (DV) that could affect the number of office referrals, including:

    * Classroom management

    * Student perceptions

    * Teacher perceptions

    * Types/severity of student behaviors

    * Frequency and duration of misconduct

    2. Did the implementation of RTI2B (IV) have an effect on student achievement (DV)?

    * There are other factors (DV) that affect student achievement, including:

    * Socio-economic status

    * Family situations

    * Student ability levels

    * Social incentives

    * Class size

    * Gender

    * Adult expectations

    * Fidelity of instruction

    Qualitative:

    1. How has the implementation of RTI2B affected instructional time within the classroom? (C/F–student behavior)

    * There are many aspects of instructional time that need to be considered when answering this question, including:

    * Length of class

    * Allotted times for instruction, independent work, and center time

    * Time of most discipline issues

    * Number of professionals/paraprofessionals present in classroom

    2. Is there a difference between attitudes of middle school and elementary school teachers regarding the implementation of RTI2B? (C/F–teacher attitudes)

    * There are many aspects that can affect teacher attitudes that need to be considered when answering the question, including:

    * Teacher personality

    * Teacher beliefs

    * Stress levels

    * Class size

    * School/work environment

    * Student attitudes

    • Matthew Smith May 25, 2018 at 5:08 pm

      Cindy,

      I think one factor that you could definitely look at would be professional development/training of RTI2B. A lot of my colleagues don’t feel comfortable with general RTI, and I believe it’s done poorly within my own building. Also, how might you define teacher personality? Have them take a myers-briggs personality test or tackle it in some other way? Just food for thought.

      Best, M

      • Cindy Widner May 25, 2018 at 5:13 pm

        Hi, Matthew, we are using TN Behavior Supports Program. We actually have multiple trainings throughout the year and summer. I am hoping the PDs help teachers and principals feel better qualified to handle the behaviors.

    • Wes Anderson May 25, 2018 at 5:08 pm

      Cindy,
      Your first question is very intriguing. Oftentimes the students that do not understand or have deficiencies are the ones who act out. If RTI is achieving its goal, then these students may be less apt to act out. Would you be making a comparison of student behavior prior to RTI graduation with afterwards?

      • Cindy Widner May 25, 2018 at 5:16 pm

        Wes, my initial thought is to compare the two schools’ student behavior using data from the year before it was started and the year it began. They are still working to fully implement the program. This will be their second year for implementation. One is a rural school with a low student population while the other is in the middle of town with the highest elementary school population.

    • Melissa Jolley May 25, 2018 at 8:11 pm

      SUCH A NEEDED TOPIC!
      This past year was brutal for us! We had so many students on behavioral plans and our guidance counselor said that this coming year will be worse!
      I have heard a lot about the RTI2B and wondered how we could begin adopting it in our school.

      I think another could question to consider is teacher perception of students who are in the RTI2B- do they have pre-judgments about these students?

    • Janie Evans May 27, 2018 at 10:13 pm

      Cindy, I am looking at RTI Tier 2 on the high school side.Your question regarding teacher attitudes is interesting. Just from an observational perspective, the attitudes do seem to be very different on the elementary level vs. high school level.

  7. Matthew Smith May 25, 2018 at 5:06 pm

    Dissertation Focus: Chronic absenteeism and its impact on GPA and ACT scores

    Quantitative Questions:

    How does chronic absenteeism (I/V) impact student GPA (D/V) and ACT scores (D/V)?
    Other factors: testing anxiety, honors vs standard classes, academic rigor, classes taken in middle school, number of times having taken the ACT, socio economic status, ACT test prep as a course offering
    How does chronic absenteeism (I/V) impact student performance in meeting ACT college readiness benchmarks (D/V)?
    Other factors: Definition of college readiness, number of times taking the ACT, college aspirations, testing anxiety, socioeconomic status, ACT prep as a course offering
    Qualitative Questions:

    What outside factors (F/C: socioeconomic status, bullying, single parent home, illness, parents’ education level) negatively impact student attendance rates the most?
    Outside factors: how truancy is handled inside the school, how truancy is handled through the juvenile courts, how one defines the following factors: socioeconomic status, bullying, single parent home, illness, etc.; What constitutes a low socioeconomic status? What are the perceptions of bullying within the school by students, parents, teachers, administrators?
    What are educators’ perceptions (F/C) on why students are chronically absent and not meeting ACT college readiness benchmarks?
    Student perceptions on meeting ACT benchmarks, parent perceptions on student meeting ACT benchmarks, administration’s perception on students meeting ACT benchmarks, student’s post-secondary aspirations, parents’ post-secondary aspirations for their student(s); school and home focus on post-secondary training

    • Clint Epley May 27, 2018 at 10:44 am

      Matthew,
      This is an interesting study. Where will you find this data and how big will the sample size be? Studies need to be done on this because absenteeism is a problem across the country to my knowledge. I wonder if these factors change as we travel throughout the country or from urban to rural? I’d assume so but interesting to see.

      Good study that I’ll be interested to follow!

      Clint

  8. Lori Hill May 25, 2018 at 7:29 pm

    Part A

    Research Question: What are the effects of standards-based grading [IV] on student achievement [DV]?

    There are many other factors (DVs) that could affect student achievement, including:

    mandatory vs. voluntary implementation of standards-based grading

    alignment of standards to instruction (fidelity)

    grade level expectations (specific content)

    attendance

    socio-economic status of the students (high, middle, low)

    gender

    Part B

    Research Question: What is the relationship between standards-based grading [IV] and teachers’ years of experience [DV]?

    There are many aspects of teachers’ years of experience (DVs) that need to be considered in answering the question, including:

    teachers’ knowledge and understanding of standards-based grading

    number of professional development opportunities given to teachers

    mandatory vs. voluntary implementation of standards-based grading

    grade levels taught

    teachers’ knowledge of alignment of standards to instruction (fidelity)

    • Jessica Ordonez May 25, 2018 at 8:13 pm

      Lori,
      Could level of administrator support be a factor?

    • Matthew Smith May 26, 2018 at 8:55 am

      Lori,

      One thing you might could add would be student, parent, teacher, and administrator perceptions of standards-based grading. I know when the switch happened for one school in my county, it was really difficult to get veteran teachers and parents on board because they didn’t fully understand the process. In some weird way, I feel like educators already have a perception on standards-based grading no matter if they fully understand it or not. Is there a way to compare two sample classrooms and the outcomes of one using standards-based grading and one that doesn’t? That could be a really powerful approach.

  9. Melissa Jolley May 25, 2018 at 7:47 pm

    How has community structures/educational structures influenced the education of minority populations?
    Quantitative:
    1. Examine the achievement scores (DV) of minority population within 2 different community settings (IV) diverse schools and racially imbalanced schools.
    • Socio-economic status of the communities (high, middle, low)
    • Fidelity of the implementation
    • Classification of achievement level of the students into high, middle, low categories
    • Gender
    • Grade band of students
    • Defining achievement
    • Defining “minority” populations

    2. Examine the ratio between minority enrollments in AP/Honor level courses (DV) with minority faculty representation (IV).
    • Socio-economic status of the communities (high, middle, low)
    • Fidelity of the implementation
    • Gender
    • Grade band of students
    • Defining achievement
    • Defining “minority” populations
    • Defining faculty positions

    Qualitative:
    1. How has the impact of racially isolated communities affect minority achievement?
    Things to consider before answering the question, including:
    • Examining social impact
    • Examining academic impact
    • Examining sense of belonging
    • Examining sense of safety
    • Examining justice
    • Expectations

    2. What are the cultural factors that influence minority achievement in schools? (F/C categories)
    Things to consider before answering the question, including:
    • Socio-economic status of the communities (high, middle, low)
    • Ratio of diversity within the community
    • Gender
    • Grade band of students
    • Faculty representation
    • School culture
    • Expectations

    • Wes Anderson May 25, 2018 at 10:01 pm

      Melissa, in regards to Quantitative Question 2, I think an extension of your topic – community/educational structure – would include the ratio of minority teachers of AP and honors courses as well as the student ratio; are you including the ratios of both minority students and teachers of AP/Honors courses?

  10. Sarah Anderson May 25, 2018 at 7:59 pm

    Standards based teaching / method of teaching secondary mathematics

    Quantitative Questions:

    Does standards based teaching [IV] increase student test scores [DV]?
    •topic arrangement
    •time spent on each topic
    •student “intelligence” in the subject matter
    •standards based grading

    Does standards based teaching [IV] increase the fluency of the topics [DV]?
    •grade level
    •how many teachers have used standards based teaching

    Qualitative Questions:

    How do you feel the standards effect how you teach [F/C] (specific grade/subject) mathematics?
    •fluency of topics
    •teaching methodology
    •testing practices
    •resources used
    •grading practices

    How do the standards affect your teaching methodology [F/C]?
    •fluency of topics
    •How is your teaching structured – do you follow county pacing guide, text book, or standards?
    •grade level / subject

    • Jessica Ordonez May 25, 2018 at 8:11 pm

      Sarah,
      When I briefly taught math, I noticed that students’ test scores and fluency had a lot to do with which teacher they had in previous years. Sex/gender may also play a role in student achievement.

      • Sarah Anderson May 27, 2018 at 3:40 pm

        Jessica, I did my master’s research on gender differences in mathematics achievement. I may include it as a component of my research.

    • Teresa Kirkland May 26, 2018 at 4:05 pm

      Sarah, I am currently teaching 6th grade math. Personally, the standards dictate almost every part of my students classroom experience. I think this will be interesting research.

    • Lavette Dismuke May 28, 2018 at 12:44 am

      I admire your approach Sarah. I teach career and technical education courses and the classes are completely standards based. Although there are no state assessments for these courses, I find that teaching the standards are not as useful as teaching them the skills needed to master the standards. In the core courses, this is not the case. Have you considered other approaches to your research?

  11. Jessica Ordonez May 25, 2018 at 8:03 pm

    Topic: Out of school time (OST) STEM programs

    Part A:

    How does participation in OST STEM programs (IV) affect standardized test scores (DV)?
    There are many other factors that could affect standardized test scores, including:
    *Socioeconomic status
    *Sex of student
    *Gender
    *Race/ethnicity
    *Test bias
    *School funding
    *Teacher competence
    *Absentee rate
    *Participation in after school activities
    *Student holding a job
    *Exceptional or ESL status
    *Exposure to violence
    *Abuse in the home
    *Reading level
    *Student illness

    How does OST STEM program quality (IV) affect student outcomes (DV)?
    There are many other factors that could affect student outcomes, including:
    *Socioeconomic status
    *Parental involvement
    *Attendance at a quality preschool
    *Access to healthcare
    *Parent marital status
    *School funding
    *Teacher competence
    *Absentee rate
    *Participation in after school activities
    *Student holding a job
    *Exceptional or ESL status
    *Exposure to violence
    *Abuse in the home

    Part B:

    How does socioeconomic status [F/C] affect participation in STEM programming?
    There are many aspects of STEM programming participation that need to be considered in answering the question including:
    *Cost
    *Transportation
    *Interest level
    *Parent work schedule
    *Participation in other OST programs

    What factors influence elementary school girls [F/C] to participate in OST STEM programming?
    There are many aspects of OST STEM program participation that need to be considered in answering the question including:
    *Cost
    *Transportation
    *Interest level
    *Parent work schedule
    *Participation in other OST programs

    • Matthew Smith May 26, 2018 at 8:58 am

      Hey Jessica,

      I don’t have any real questions regarding your research besides wondering how you will determine what is and is not a STEM program. Would these schools need to be STEM accredited through AdvancED? I can’t really think of any other influencing factors for your qualitative questions. What outcomes would you be looking at in your 2nd quantitative question? Increase in attendance and increase in grades from Q1 to Q2, etc.?
      Best,
      M

      • Jessica Ordonez May 26, 2018 at 10:26 pm

        Matthew,
        I am looking at afterschool programs that are offered by community partners such as museums, zoos, etc. I asked the same question of another student who is studying STEM schools, but I did not consider that I need to define a STEM program. I do not think there is an accreditation for afterschool STEM programs, but I could be wrong. More research is needed!

        Outcomes-I have not decided what defines an “outcome” yet. What I would love to see is a longitudinal study that looks at career choices, but that is perhaps a future project. Standardized test scores, and attendance, overall grades are all good ways to measure “outcomes.”
        Thanks for making me think!

        Jessica

  12. Janie Evans May 26, 2018 at 11:13 am

    Research: What are the barriers to ELA Success in Secondary RTI?
    Quantitative Questions:
    1. Do ELA RTI Tier 2 interventions (IV ) in grade 9 improve ELA EOC scores (DV) in grades 9-11?
    There are many aspects (DV) of current RTI Tier 2 interventions that should be considered in answering the question, including:
    *Amount of time allotted daily/weekly for Tier 2 interventions
    *Number of students moving out of Tier 2 and amount of contact hours students receive from teacher/specialist to reaffirm students are on track in course work.
    *Number of Tier 2 students passing ELA courses.
    *Number of Tier 2 students exhibiting growth on ELA EOC’s.

    2. Do ELA RTI Tier 2 interventions (IV) in grade 9 improve ACT reading and English Scores? (DV)
    There are many aspects of current RTI Tier 2 interventions in grade 9 that should be considered in answering the question, including:
    *Amount of time allotted daily/weekly for student interventions directly linked to ACT English and reading benchmarks.
    *Amount of training RTI Tier 2 interventionist receive in ACT reading and English skills.
    *Tier 2 students and ACT scores in English and reading

    Qualitative Questions:
    1. What are the academic barriers for ELA RTI success in high school?
    There are many factors that could affect ELA RTI success in high school, including:
    * skills gaps
    * reading level
    *disorders such as dyslexia and lack of skilled personnel to address those issues.
    *student motivation

    2. What are the environmental barriers for ELA RTI success in high school?
    There are many environmental factors (DV) that could affect ELA RTI success in high school, including:
    *lack of family supports
    *attendance issues
    *socioeconomic issues
    *teacher culture/perceptions regarding RTI
    *fidelity of RTI implementation
    *test anxiety

    By: Janie L. Evans
    Date: 05/24/2018 9:23 pm
    Reply | Edit |

    • Teresa Kirkland May 26, 2018 at 4:15 pm

      I think test anxiety is an important factor in student success for all grade levels. I have many 6th grade students who are able to successfully complete formative assessments but consistently fail summative assessments due to anxiety.

  13. Clint Epley May 26, 2018 at 3:06 pm

    Topic: Best 1:1 Technology Implementation Processes

    Quantitative Questions:

    Do professional learning communities (IV) increase teacher utilization of 1:1(DV) in classroom?

    There are many other factors (DVs) that could affect teacher utilization of 1:1 technology, including:

    Prior experience with technology

    Openness to using technology

    Available LMS

    Interest in changing teaching strategies and lesson plans

    Availability of support staff to ease implementation and issues that arise.

    Readily available professional development opportunities

    Administrators ability to promote a culture friendly to trying to things

    Do 1:1 technology professional development (IV) opportunities increase student achievement (DV)?

    There are many other factors (DVs) that could affect student achievement, including:

    Socio economic status

    Internet availability

    Professional Development in other areas such as personal needs of students

    Student Teacher Ratios

    Gender

    Reading levels

    Student access to necessary resources to complete assignments

    Part B Qualitative Questions

    Does a lack of teacher knowledge [F/C], in regards to the relevant technology, hinder teachers’ ability to implement 1:1 learning in their classrooms?

    There are many aspects of the current practices that need to be considered in answering the question, including:

    Best 1:1 devices for education purposes

    Teachers previous level of access to technology in the workplace

    Teachers attitudes towards 1:1 techs effect on student achievement

    Devices ability to positively / negatively affect student achievement

    Availability of ongoing professional development opportunities

    Availability of personalized professional development opportunities

    Teacher attendance to optional ongoing professional development opportunities

    Best available professional development opportunities / practices

    Best support systems / programs for teachers to utilize in class

    Cost of support programs (Study Island, IXL,etc.) that may assist teacher implementation

    Does budgeting [F/C] impact technology personnel’s ability to efficiently implement 1:1 technology across a school system (7 schools)?

    There are many aspects of the current practices that need to be considered in answering the question, including:

    Distribution of funding

    Availability of addition support personnel

    Ratio of technology personnel to teachers / device in the system – & money for hiring additional

    Amount of money spent on repairs

    Insurance policies for 1:1 tech

    Sustainability of 1:1 technology and support programs

    Comparison of textbook prices vs 1:1 / Open Education Resources (OER) over a period of time

    • Janie Evans May 27, 2018 at 2:05 pm

      This is a very timely subject. The 1:1 technology seems to be moving so fast. It’s even changing the way districts determine textbooks and materials.

    • Jordan Reed May 31, 2018 at 4:32 pm

      This is a very thorough list of questions, and I agree: this is a timely topic. As technology grows, the need for proper implementation is key.

  14. Teresa Kirkland May 26, 2018 at 4:02 pm

    QUANTITATIVE QUESTIONS
    1. Did an increase in truancy [IV] in middle school students lead to a decrease in student achievement [DV] on the 2018 TNREADY Mathematics assessment?
    • socio-economic status of the students (high, middle, low)
    • specific content being learned
    • typical achievement level of the students (high, middle, low)
    • gender
    • age group
    • ADA history
    • Classroom management
    • Teacher experience level
    • Teacher education level
    • Student home life (transient, abuse, adult perception)

    2. What effect does chronic absenteeism [IV] have on middle school student achievement [DV] on the 2018 TNREADY Mathematics assessment?
    • socio-economic status of the students (high, middle, low)
    • specific content being learned
    • typical achievement level of the students (high, middle, low)
    • gender
    • age group
    • ADA history
    • Classroom management
    • Teacher experience level
    • Teacher education level
    • Student home life (transient, abuse, adult perception)
    • Rationale behind absences: dr visit, tardy, unexcused, excused, parent notes
    • Medical history

    QUALITATIVE QUESTIONS
    1. What perceptions do teachers have of the relationship between student chronic absenteeism and classroom performance[C/F–teacher perception and attitude]?
    • socio-economic status of the students (high, middle, low)
    • specific content being learned
    • typical achievement level of the students (high, middle, low)
    • gender
    • age group
    • Classroom management style
    • Teacher experience level
    • Teacher education level
    • Rationale behind absences: dr visit, tardy, unexcused, excused, parent notes
    • Medical history
    • Teacher interaction with students
    • Routine for completing make-up work
    • Grading policy

    2. What perceptions do students have regarding chronic absenteeism/truancy and how those absences affect their educational experience[C/F–student perceptions and beliefs]?
    • socio-economic status of the students (high, middle, low)
    • specific content being learned
    • typical achievement level of the students (high, middle, low)
    • gender
    • age group
    • Classroom management style
    • Teacher experience level
    • Teacher education level
    • Rationale behind absences: dr visit, tardy, unexcused, excused, parent notes
    • Medical history
    • Teacher interaction with students
    • Routine for completing make-up work
    • Grading policy
    • Discipline referrals
    • Student interaction with teachers
    • Student understanding of the level of importance that parents and/or guardians place on attendance and education

    • Sarah Anderson May 27, 2018 at 3:35 pm

      Teresa,

      Are you planning to look at students over a single year or those that have a pattern of absenteeism over several years?

      Sarah

  15. Julia Wenzel-Huguley May 27, 2018 at 5:42 pm

    Reposting from the discussion board. Thank you for the comments and things to think about!

    The effects of World Language study and academic achievement

    Looking to answer the question: “Does taking a world language affect student achievement?”

    Quantitative

    Do high school students [IV] who take four years of a world language have higher ACT writing scores [DV]?

    -Are students enrolled by choice? Are more motivated students in a world language class?

    -ELL students or those who did not first speak English

    -Transient students

    -SES of students and that effect on achievement

    -Grade level when taking ACT

    -What English class they have taken

    -Did student have ACT prep course?

    How many students in a class of seniors [IV] take four years of a world language [DV]?

    -Are students enrolled by choice?

    -Sex of students – are more girls or boys enrolled (does this matter?)

    -Languages offered

    -Native speakers enrolled in world language

    -Number of students that did not spend all 4 years at sample school

    Qualitative

    What goal [C] do the students taking a world language class for four years in high school have for using their language after high school?

    -Do students have defined goals

    -What plans do students have after high school- college / tech training / workforce

    -Other classes that have an influence on possible careers

    What motivated student [C] to take a world language course and continue throughout the four years [F]?

    -Parent involvement / encouragement at home

    -School influences: was it suggested by a teacher/counselor

    -What exposure does student have to a language other than English outside of school

    • Lavette Dismuke May 28, 2018 at 12:41 am

      Great questions! Considering that most students who take the ACT do so during their Junior year, would the consideration of showing growth from Junior to Senior year scores be taken into consideration? Also some schools do not offer a large variety of world language, how would that factor?

  16. Lavette Dismuke May 28, 2018 at 12:38 am

    Part A 
    Question 1: Which subgroups of students (IV) benefit the most from individual instruction (DV) from their teachers?
    Other Variable Factors:
    – Socio-economic status 
    – Gender 
    – Materials being taught 
    – Teacher instructional methods
    Question 2: Do teachers that require individual or group conferences (IV) have higher academic performances (DV) than those who do not?
    Other Variable Factors:
    – Small classroom settings
    – One on one time
    – Higher grades on tests
    – More improvement on assessments

    Part B:
    1. How do teachers establish healthy relationships (F) that foster better academic performance from students (C)?
    Other factors that must be taken into consideration: 
    – Number of students the teacher has 
    – Nature of the courses taught 
    – The teacher’s level of experience 

    2. What activities do the schools create and host (F) that encourage relationships between the students and teachers (C)?
    Other factors that must be taken into consideration: 
    – Times activities are held
    – Amount of participation from both the students and teachers
    – Funding available for activities

  17. Tina Shepherd May 30, 2018 at 5:20 pm

    Topic: The effects of bias’ towards the Lesbian, gay, bi-sexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) student in the academic setting

  18. Tina Shepherd May 30, 2018 at 5:24 pm

    A.
    Topic: Lesbian, gay, bi-sexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) student in the academic setting
    Quantitative questions:
    1. Do LGBTQ students have higher safety risks (IV) in school (DV) than other students?
    There are many factors (DV) to review including:
    • Discipline referrals
    • Classroom management
    • Student behavior

    2. Do LGBTQ students face discrimination more in the 21st century (IV) in the school setting (DV) than they did 15 years ago?
    There are other factors (DV) that could have affected the school setting 15 years ago including:
    • Teacher perception and beliefs
    • Student perception and beliefs
    • Sexual orientation not disclosed

    B.
    Qualitative questions:
    (old question) 1. A) What activities and or trainings can schools provide (F) that encourage anti-discrimination, anti-bullying, anti-harassment among the school staff and students?(C)
    (new question)1. B) What policies and procedures have been implemented (F) to guard against homophobia in the schools? (C)
    There are many variables that guard against homophobia in the schools that need to be considered when answering this question including:
    • Legal practices
    • District policies
    • School policies

    2. A) How can school staff, parents, and other adults respond (F) to negative behavior and inspire students to be the change?(C)
    There are other variables in responding to negative behavior and inspiring students to be the change including:
    • Gay straight alliances
    • Community agencies
    • Professional development
    • Peer influence

    • Jordan Reed May 31, 2018 at 4:30 pm

      I think this is a great topic and these are some solid questions.
      How do discipline referrals figure into measuring safety risks? Are you looking at referrals of LGBTQ students only, or referrals from all students? What I’m thinking is what is the process for determining relevant referrals. Let’s say a student gets into a fight and is suspended. How do you determine its relevance; are you looking at motivations behind the referral (i.e. an unprovoked attack on a LGBTQ student or maybe a LGBTQ student is tired of being bullied and lashed out)? Does that make sense?

  19. Debbie Booker May 30, 2018 at 5:27 pm

    Topic: The necessity of nontraditional schools for at risk students

    Quantitative questions:
    1) Do at-risk students perform better academically (IV) at nontraditional/alternative schools (DV) than traditional schools?
    There are many factors that could affect nontraditional/alternative schools settings such as: attendance, behavior, relationships among students and teachers, school culture

    2) What are the distinctive processes nontraditional schools use (IV) that are effective at improving the academic performance of at-risk students (DV)?
    There are many factors that could affect the academic performance of at-risk students such as: demographics, classroom size, traditions, data, resources,

    Qualitative questions:
    1) What are the characteristics (F) of teachers in nontraditional schools where students(C) are successful?
    There are many variables that could affect students’ success such as: attendance, behavior, school culture/climate, demographics
    2) What is the success rate of at risk students (F) who have graduated from nontraditional schools compared to traditional schools (C)?
    There are many factors that could contribute to the success rate of at risk students graduating such as: family characteristics, high expectations, instructional quality, number of classes a day, size of classes

  20. Jordan Reed May 30, 2018 at 9:30 pm

    Best practices on teaching students with learning differences such as Autism, ADHD, TBI, etc.

    Quantitative:
    1: In what ways does the implementation of a positive behavior intervention system (PBIS, Mystique Points System) [IV] cause a reduction in adverse student behavior [DV]?
    There are other factors that could affect adverse student behavior:
    1. Student Medication
    2. Access to therapy
    3. Academic material being covered / confidence with academic material

    2: What effect does smaller class sizes (student:teacher ratio of 7:1) [IV] have on achievement levels of students with learning differences [DV]?
    There are other factors that could affect the achievement levels of students with learning differences:
    1. Socio-economic background
    2. Mode of assessment
    3. Student medication
    4. Content being learned
    5. Level of support offered
    6. Type of support available

    Qualitative:
    1: What are student and faculty perceptions [F/C] on the ways PBIS changes student behaviors (WRT classroom management)?
    There are many aspects that need to be considered, including:
    1. Faculty perceptions of behavior before / after implementation
    2. How students perceive their own behavior / feel accountable for their own behavior
    3. How students perceive their behavior before / after implementation
    4. How to measure classroom management?
    a. What are the signs of a well managed classroom?
    b. Students on task, engaged
    5. How do students perceive their ability to focus on a task in a classroom before / after implementing PBIS

    2: What are faculty perceptions on the effectiveness of their teaching [F/C] in smaller classes? What are student perceptions on their abilities to learn / be engaged [F/C] in smaller classes?
    There are many aspects that need to be considered, including:
    1. How does one measure effectiveness of teaching? Achievement data? Curriculum assessments?
    2. Comparisons between perceived and actual effectiveness
    3. Ways of measuring student perceptions of their own abilities
    4. Perceived abilities vs actual abilities
    5. How to measure engagement / on-task behavior

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